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Are You Part of a Religious Conspiracy?

May 14, 2010

Here’s something to think about.  The other day I happened to turn on the television and saw a relatively known preacher singing the song El-Shaddai. I have heard this song several times and usually when it is song it is usually this same stanza:

El Shaddai, el shaddai
El-elyon na adonia
Age to age you’re still the same
By the power of the name

 

El Shaddai, el shaddai
El-elyon na adonia
I will praise and lift you high

 

El Shaddai


It is a beautiful song lyrically but what's interesting about this song and the people that sing it.  Is that it is never concluded that they are worshipping different gods.  It is always understood that El-Shaddai, El-Elyon, El-Adonai, etc. are all various attributes and names about the One God - YHWH, whom is described a lot as El.

So, why when the Kamitic people wrote hymns in which they pay homage to the One God – Nebertcher and call off the various attributes and names of the One God – such as Amun Ra, Khepe-Ra, Ra Atum, Afu Ra, Asar Ra, etc. whom they described as Ra.  The Kamitic people (and other traditional Africans) as well as other non-Westerners are called idol worshippers?

For those that ask why is it important? It is important because when you focus on other people's spirituality and not your own. You are not able to see your own divinity because of lack of understanding of other people's culture.  When you don't see your own divinity you are not able to achieve your full potential, hence poverty, crime, social ills, etc.  All because you see the Divine in other people's tradition - "El" but not your own - "Ra".  So you see, some of the problems that exist in our life are no one faults but our own.  This is what leads me to ask the question, "Are you part of a religious conspiracy?"

For a complete discourse see MAA AANKH: Finding God the Afro-American Way,
by Honoring the Ancestors and Guardian Spirits

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